New Additions: Magnum Opus

Posted by on Apr 4, 2014 in Farm Blog, Goats | 8 comments

A few weeks ago while Lotus, Lia, and Minnie were all on imminent kidding watch, we brought a new junior herd sire to the farm.

This photo doesn't do him justice, as like most kids he does not want to stand still for a photograph

This photo doesn’t do him justice, as like most kids he does not want to stand still for a photograph

I admit that I have been epically remiss in introducing everyone to this new fine fellow, but between spring schedules, and wrapping up kidding season, I simply couldn’t find enough hours in the day to sit down and write this post, let alone find time, on a dry fair-weather day, to take some photos of him. So, without further ado, we’d like to finally introduce you to Trilogy Ranch SHH Magnum Opus.

Magnum Opus on lookout in the pasture

Magnum Opus on lookout in the pasture

‘Magnum Opus’ is defined as ‘the greatest achievement of an artist, writer, or composer‘.  In an effort to branch out further, genetically speaking, Magnum (just ‘Opie’ to his friends) is now the newest addition to the Curbstone Valley buck pen.

When striving to make herd improvements, it’s important not to limit oneself on breeding choices. Or at least that’s my excuse, besides, despite being seasonally stinky, I absolutely adore our boys. They’re all sweet tempered, and endlessly entertaining to have around. Note to self, that when we finally move the farm to flatter ground, I’d love to have a bigger buck barn.

Opie was a little shy when he first arrived...

Opie was a little shy when he first arrived…

...and a little tired, but he found a perfect log for a pillow

…and a little tired, but he found a perfect log for a pillow

Purchasing bucks, however, isn’t terribly straightforward. First, you have to identify the weaknesses in your own herd. Then finding excellent quality bucks, whose dams and sires both have the right combination of traits, pedigrees, and performance that you’re looking for, especially in regards to areas you’d like to improve, isn’t as easy as you might think. Even after assessing parentage, pedigrees, and performance, your buck of choice may simply not be available. Sometimes, though, everything comes together, and more often than not, as typically happens with goats, it’s when you least expect it…smack dab in the middle of your busiest time of year.

He soon came of his shell, and quickly staked a claim to the best rocks in the pasture

He soon came of his shell, and quickly staked a claim to the best rocks in the pasture

Magnum combines some of the best genetics from the Algedi Farm herd, a herd with a well-earned reputation for excellence in dairy conformation, and I’ve admired Magnum’s dam, Algedi Farm D Capella, for quite some time.

Magnum playing king of the hay bucket

Magnum playing king of the hay bucket

Capella is a finished permanent champion, and her dam, Rosasharn’s TL Zenith, has produced a number of beautiful champion daughters. I had previously inquired about the potential availability of a buckling from Capella, so when the opportunity to bring Magnum to the farm this spring finally presented itself, it was an easy choice to make.

Brenna keeping an eye on the 'new kid'

Brenna keeping an eye on the ‘new kid’

Magnum’s dam is a stunning, and petite doe, with many of the qualities that immediately draw my eye, including a beautifully level top line, with very good length of body, and levelness from hips to pins, along with a capacious, and well-supported mammary system.

Magnum checking out the new feeder

Magnum checking out the new feeder

and investigating the water buckets on a warm afternoon

and investigating the water buckets on a warm afternoon

This all resulted in Capella finishing her permanent grand championship as a first freshener, when more often than not, first fresheners tend to lack the overall maturity required to be able to truly compete against the ‘big girls’ in the ring their first time out.

Magnum and photo-bombing friend

Magnum and photo-bombing friend

Capella’s dam, Rosasharn TL Zenith, has produced a number of finished champions, and has held up remarkably well as she’s aged, still scoring EEVE on linear appraisal as an 8 year-old.

Taking a break between bounces

Taking a break between bounces

Magnum’s sire, Algedi Farm Sizzlin’ Hot Honey, is also from a dam, Rosasharn UMT Tupelo Honey, that appraised with an excellent EEEE91 on linear appraisal as an 8 year-old doe, so overall we’re looking for daughters from him with excellence both in dairy character, and in mammary, with longevity.

"See how handsome I am?"

“See how handsome I am?”

His sire, Algedi Farm Sizzlin’ Hot Honey is the son of Rosasharn’s UMT Tupelo Honey, who, the last I checked, has four finished ADGA champion daughters, and Tupelo herself was the daughter of an 2007 AGS National Champion. Sizzlin’s sire, Algedi Farm Drops of Jupiter, was appraised as an EEE 91 buck, and has sired some gorgeous champion daughters, too.

"Yeah, sure...but let's play!"

“Yeah, sure…but let’s play!”

Needless to say, Magnum’s forebearers have given this little guy some very big hooves to fill, but his pedigree is very promising, and we’re very excited to see what Magnum will contribute to our herd.

He's not the easiest to photograph as he's always on the move!

He’s not the easiest to photograph as he’s always on the move!

We’re so excited to bring this sweet and mellow young buck into our herd, and are greatly looking forward to meeting his first daughters!

A very special thank you, both to Michael and Krystal of Trilogy Ranch, and to Kalee at Algedi Farm, for allowing this very handsome young buck to become the newest junior herd sire at Curbstone Valley Farm.

8 Comments

  1. He’s got a magnificent name and handsome symmetrical markings on his face. Photogenic, of course!
    Congrats on the new member of the family.
    Sue Langley´s last post…Advanced Class! Fairy gardens to the next level…

    • I was always taught to be careful what you name something, as they might live up to it. So along that idea, I thought I’d give him a name to aspire too 😉 He is a very handsome fellow, albeit very active, and actually quite challenging to get good pictures of. Once the weather warms a bit, and he gets his first summer haircut, we’ll try for some better posed pics, but for now I’m just enjoying watching him be a typical 6 week-old buckling (who is already blubbering, and trying his best lines on the ladies)!

  2. He’s definitely a handsome little guy! I’m so enjoying meeting all your new goats. You must be so tired at the end of the day after taking care of all these energetic young uns!
    PlantPostings´s last post…Wordless Wednesday: Cedar waxwings on a sunny spring day

    • I do admit that after the last bottle feeding at night, I feel a little like a zombie 😉 It is tiring, and a lot of hard work, but it’s also a tremendous amount of fun 😀

  3. What a sweet addition. I think my favorite photo is the one with Magnum and his photo-bombing friend!
    Carla´s last post…Raised Beds and More Garden Updates for 2014

    • Ah, yes. The E2 wether…photobomber extraordinaire! He’s weaseled his way into more than one photo lately 🙂

  4. Clare I can’t get over how many darlings you now have and I still remember when you brought home the first 2…they are having so much fun and I suspect you are too.
    [email protected] last post…Abundant Seeds and Greens

    • It’s a slippery slope. If someone can tell me how on earth we bounced from 2 to 22, I’d love to know. It must be goat math. It just doesn’t make sense 😉 I must admit, I’m very much looking forward to sending some of our spring kids on to their new homes! I love them, but I’m starting to feel like a full-time goat-herder!