Bouncing Back Into Spring – Part II

Posted by on Mar 24, 2014 in Farm Blog, Goats | 12 comments

Last night Curbstone Valley Mariposa Lily presented us with triplets! Two doelings, and a buckling, bringing us to a total of 6 does, and 6 bucks, for the season. A 50:50 buck to doe ratio? I’m happy with that!

Lily was bred to Castle Rock Abraham Darby back in October, and until about the last hour before she kidded, except for her impressive girth, you’d never know Lily was even pregnant. As a yearling, she remained remarkably bouncy throughout her pregnancy, which until last night was quite uneventful.

Curbstone Valley Mariposa Lily was bred to Castle Rock Abraham Darby in October 2013

Curbstone Valley Mariposa Lily was bred to Castle Rock Abraham Darby in October 2013

Saturday was day 145 of her pregnancy (and Lily’s birthday), and her ligaments were still taught that evening. By Sunday morning, day 146, there was significant softening of her ligaments, but they were still palpable, and her udder had filled a little more, but nothing overly significant. Maybe she wouldn’t go until Monday?

Despite how round Lily looks here, at day 142, she was still remarkably active and agile!

Despite how round Lily looks here, at day 142, she was still remarkably active and agile!

With as round as Lily was though, and with some very subtle shifts in potential pre-kidding signs, my instinct suggested I should keep Lily in the kidding stall yesterday. At one point, around 4PM I was the recipient of a full facial, as Lily decided to try to clean every square inch on my face. Minnie was the same just before she kidded, but Lily wasn’t showing any other overt signs of impending delivery.

Although I don’t leave the farm during active ‘kidding watch’, we do still have chores to get done. Sunday we were permanently setting up the new milking machine, and planned to try milking Lotus, Lia, and Minnie with the machine Sunday night for the first time.

Our new bucket milker system

Our new bucket milker system

Vacuum pressures, and pulsation rates were set, the equipment was all washed, and I’d just loaded a stainless steel bucket with pre-milking sanitizer, and hauled it, along with the milking bucket, hoses, and inflations, out to the milking area…a now repurposed area of our workshop.

Being on kidding watch, everywhere I go, the video camera monitor goes too. I set the monitor down on the stanchion for a second, and was about to plug in the milk machine to run the santizer through it, before going to the barn to get the first doe, when I heard a yell through the monitor. Not an ordinary goat bleat, but the sort of scream that only a doe who is actively pushing during hard labor usually makes.

I lept over the stanchion to see the monitor and saw Lily, who had been standing up and non-chalantly eating a few minutes before, was now prone, legs fully extended up against the stall wall, and she was pushing…hard! Ok, I guess I’ll milk the does later!

I’m not twenty-something anymore…I’m not even thirty-something anymore, but I ran down to the barn faster than I’ve probably run anywhere in two decades! Admittedly, it was downhill, so that definitely gave me an advantage.

At first glance everything seemed normal. Lily was on about her third or fourth push though, and something was suddenly very NOT normal. I could see TWO amniotic sacs, or ‘baby bubbles’, not just the typical one, and no immediate sign of hooves or noses in either one. Ooookaaaay. Time to glove up, and see what’s going on.

My biggest fear was that we’d have a presentation with two heads. That can be especially challenging as the kids can quickly strangle each other as there isn’t room for both of them to pass, and time works against you as their heads quickly become engorged due to the pressure.

I was relieved though when the first thing my hand touched was a single hind leg. I had the foot, and just beyond that I could feel the point of the hock, and then the rump. The next leg across though was a front leg, not a hind one, and then I found myself touching…teeth! So there was also a muzzle.

Clearly this was not a simple breech, or head down, this time I had two kids that thought playing a game of “Twister” on the way out would be MUCH MORE fun. GAH! I felt back over toward the first kid, just to verify the orientation of each kid before proceeding, as it’s imperative when two kids present together to NOT make the situation any worse, for the sake of the dam, if not for the sake of the kids.

Lily is only a yearling, but thankfully she’s a Lotus daughter, and for that I love her. She has her dam’s great hip width, and excellent body capacity, even though she’s only a petite 50 lb yearling doe.

Lily was born last March, and is a Lotus daughter

Lily was born last March, and is a Lotus daughter

If a kid needs help finding the exit, it’s always easier if it’s not the first kid being born, as things are quite crowded until the first kid is born. As such, I couldn’t repel either kid backwards very much, or that easily, so it was time to get creative. Did I mention Lily is only a 50 lb doe? There’s a reason I love Nigerian Dwarves. You can just pick them up when you need to.

I crouched down in the kidding stall and braced myself against the wall, and Mr. Curbstone helped me get Lily up on her feet (most does prefer to kid laying on their side). With Lily standing both kids actually retracted slightly, which was encouraging, but not enough to free either one of them. Using gravity to my advantage though, and not having a ramp handy, I hoisted Lily’s rear end up, and set her rear legs across my crouched knees, so we could elevate her rear end up, and that did the trick perfectly. Thanks to Lily’s excellent body capacity, even though she was carrying 20% of her bodyweight in kids, I was quickly able to repel the kid that was face forward. It’s often much more efficient to pull the kid presenting its hind feet, first. So then I quickly reached under the kid that was coming out backwards to find its other leg. Cupping both hind feet in my hand, on the next push, that first doeling then just slid right out.

Just born, the E10 doe makes her debut

Just born, the E10 doe makes her debut

The E10 doeling, almost dry and fluffed out

The E10 doeling, almost dry and fluffed out

When kids are tangled together on the way out though, it’s usually prudent not to wait too long before retrieving the other kid, so as soon as the first kid’s airways were clear, and Lily was actively tending to her new baby, I went back in for number two. That kid was already back in position and gunning it for the door, left foreleg and muzzle en route, but still with a retained right foreleg at the shoulder.

This doe was smaller than the first though, Lily was pushing, and this doe was progressing forward, so with some gentle downward traction we were able to get her second doeling out without too much fuss. She probably would have done just fine on her own without my help.

The E11 doeling looks almost exactly like her sister, except she doesn't have the large brown smudge on her nose

The E11 doeling looks almost exactly like her sister, except she doesn’t have the large brown smudge on her nose. She also got Lily’s ears!!!

E11 doe, almost dry

E11 doe, almost dry

Lily ultrasounded with triplets though, so I expected at least one more kid. I gave Lily a break for a few minutes, so we could both catch our breath, and to give her time to bond with her two doelings, and then palpated her abdomen to verify there was at least one more to come. At this point Lily was diligently cleaning off her kids, so I watched and waited to see how things would progress now that the exit was no longer blocked by the ‘Twister Twins’. In just a couple of minutes, Lily started to push again.

Does often scream when they give birth, much like us humans do, but experienced goat owners can usually discern the difference between the ‘don’t mind me…I’m just having a baby‘ scream from the ‘HELP ME GET THIS ALIEN OUT OF ME…NOW…PULLEEEZE!!!‘ scream. You guessed right didn’t you? Yep, Lily was bellowing out PULLEEEZE at the top of her lungs!

E11 doe (right)

E11 doe (right)

In all the tangled confusion, her last kid didn’t quite have time to get oriented toward the exit correctly. He almost had it, but not quite. One hind limb was nicely extended, and I quickly found a foot…a hock…a rump and tail. Ah, there’s the other hock…flexed, and firmly wedged in Lily’s pelvis. Fabulous. This kid wasn’t going anywhere on his own. Poor Lily Bug.

Fortunately, with the two doelings out, there was now LOTS of room to maneuver. I apologized to Lily, once again, and after pushing him back in slightly, but not so far as to lose hold of the first leg, I fished around for the other foot, then guarding it with my hand, slowly extended the other leg alongside the first. I thought at that point that I was home free. As Lily pushed, I gently applied traction to this kid. By the time he was half way out though it became obvious that, just like his sire, this kid was as long as a freight train, and he was also bigger than either of his sisters. Lily had clearly had enough and was getting tired. With the kid half way out Lily stopped pushing for a minute, but mustering up one last burst of determination, she pushed, I pulled, and together we got this big handsome guy out.

The E12 buckling, a medium buckskin with quite a splash of white on his face, weighed in at just over 4lbs

The E12 buckling, a medium buckskin with quite a splash of white on his face, weighed in at just over 4lbs

Lily got everyone cleaned up, we cleaned Lily up, and then helped her to her feet for some much deserved warm water, hay, and grain.

Lily's kids were spotless by the time she was done them!

Lily’s kids were spotless by the time she was done them!

She was tired, but doing well considering, and the kids were all nursing, but Lily was clearly in some discomfort, and was obviously hesitant to lay back down.

E11 sipping her first meal of colostrum

E11 sipping her first meal of colostrum

To make Lily more comfortable, as she needed to rest, she got a dose of Banamine last night for the pain, and to help with inflammation, and some antibiotics to help prevent infection due to the extent of the manipulation to get her kids out. It was good to see her finally settle down for a much deserved sleep. This morning she looks much happier, and both Lily, and the kids, are doing great.

Lily tending to her kids

Lily tending to her kids

So there you have it. Just another day on the farm. It seems it’s been a challenging kidding season for a number of breeders this year, so I’m just relieved that all of our does are healthy, and all the kids this year have been robust and healthy, too.

We’ve had a very successful kidding season, and each doe presented us with at least one doeling, so we’ll likely be retaining a few gorgeous kids as additions to our herd this year. Now before we know it, it’ll be show season again! Good grief, how is it already the end of March?!

 

12 Comments

  1. Hi Clare! I’ve been following the kidding saga this year and I have to say, I’m enamoured with your goats! You have so many beauties and it seems your vet skills were called into play many times this year. Well done! It makes me wish I could have my own farm too! I hope you and Jon are well.

    Best regards,
    Traci

    • Hi Traci, so glad you stopped by! You should come up for some goatie snuggles while Lily’s babies are still small! My goat mid-wife skills have definitely been well exercised this spring. I blame the weather for the first two. In Lily’s case, I honestly think she just plain ran out of room, poor thing!

      I highly recommend your own farm. It’s a great way to stay trim. I’ve dropped two trouser sizes since kidding season started, LOL 😛 Diet, who needs a dang diet?!!?!??! Besides, we could help you get started in goats…teehee.

  2. Excellent batch of goat babies! What a wonderful bunch. As you described the birth, I thought, how nice id would be to have a ‘see-thru’ video of how it was done. Sounds like it was a nice tangle of hoofs and noses…

    …Now what? 🙂
    Sue Langley´s last post…Front porches and back doors, Flea Market style

    • Tangle…yes. Nice…maybe not so much 😉 Two kids together is definitely not my favorite, but of the possibilities, this could have been much worse. I am grateful it was Lily, and not Minnie though. Lily definitely has more body capacity, and overall that gave me more room to work. I’m just grateful for the camera monitor. I definitely paid for itself this weekend! I shudder to think what might have happened otherwise.

  3. Just another day on the farm–wow! You really get a workout during kidding season, if not all year long. The new little ones are just as cute as the others you’ve profiled recently. Reading these posts is pure joy. Thanks for sharing your adventures!
    PlantPostings´s last post…Patience, really?

    • Yep, this farm livin’ ain’t so glamorous…but it’s never dull! 😛 I do love happy endings though. I see too many breeders suggest that everything always goes so swimmingly well. The reality is that sometimes these poor goats need a little help. Let’s face it, how many women would be willing to just stay home, no doctor or mid-wife, and just ‘see what happens’? I think it’s important that people, and especially prospective goat owners, understand what they’re committing to when they choose to own goats for the first time.

  4. Really impressive teamwork between you and Lily! Have you had training or picked all that up from experience?

    • I have, in the interests of full disclosure, had training (primarily in cows), BUT I temper that with the fact that all the ‘book-learning’ in the world is zero substitute for experience. Assisting in deliveries of kids, or calves for that matter, is only truly learned, and perfected, by doing…not reading. The most important thing in a situation like this is NOT to panic. Take a deep breath, and take time to evaluate the situation at hand, and plot a reasonable course of correction before proceeding. Perhaps the most important thing to know is the limit of your ability, and know when to call for help. Ultimately, the most important thing when dealing with a dystocia is to focus on the dam…and what’s in HER best interests. It’s very easy to get so consumed with the kids, that you forget to consider the dam. It sounds harsh, but kids are replaceable. A good quality doe, is not.

  5. Wonderful writing – detailed and educational but also very much from your own perspective with your feelings and all. Adorable goat photos but it’s your descriptions of the events that make this blogsite so good. I think I will dream about goat noses tonight.
    Cindy´s last post…A Shrouded Bulb

    • Thanks, Cindy! I’m starting to feel like goat zombies have eaten my brain, so I’m surprised I can still string a coherent thought together. Kidding season always leaves me a little sleep deprived, and then when I do sleep, I’m invariably dreaming of goats (and their cute little noses) too! 😉

  6. Those faces are so adorable on those compact bodies. Spring is filled with birth and life, although ours is a little slow in coming.
    The Sage Butterfly´s last post…My Garden Notebook – April 2014

    • Spring here seems to be a non-starter. We had gorgeous, sunny, warm, and dry weather all through January and February. The kids hit the straw and we finally get rain (not that I’m complaining, as we really need it). Unfortunately, goats hate rain, so the poor kids get a bit of cabin fever when they can’t go bouncing outside for the day. Hopefully spring will sort itself out soon! 🙂